50. Renting A Fiat 500

LearnItalianPod Today you are going to learn everything (well, almost…) you need to know in order to rent a car in Italy, if you ever feel adventurous enough to drive, while there… You do know that Italians have a terrible reputation as car drivers, right? And what if you do not feel like driving? Well, you can always take a train… Enjoy!

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9 thoughts on “50. Renting A Fiat 500”

  1. I just came back from a trip to Italy where I happened to rent a car – and was overall a very nice experience…

    Italian drivers are really much more comfortable driving much closer than is typical in other countries I visited – but other than that, it was really fun!

  2. I here what you say about Italian drivers 🙂 I went to Rome recently and I think the Roman’s still drive like its a chariot race. All the best Karen

  3. Just wondering why if you are renting an apartment you use the word affitare, and if renting a car you use noleggiare. Are the words interchangeable or not?

  4. The verbs “noleggiare” and “affittare” have the same meaning – “to rent”. But they are not interchangeable. You could not say “noleggiare un appartamento”. When undecided on the one to use, pick the verb “affittare”.

  5. Ciao
    And thank you for the new things on your site.

    I have a suggestion – like the art vocabulary, it would be great vith a vocabulary connected to the wineindustry and winemaking, drinking and grapes. How about that?
    Vostro
    Henriette

  6. Come mai usate la parola “auto” invece di dire “macchina”? Io ho vissuto tanti anni in Italia e’ ho sempre usato macchina per dire “car”. Sara’ una cosa regionale? Is one more correct than the other? Bellissimi questi podcast!!

  7. When you use the word for car as “un auto” does this mean that the word is masculine? It is followed by the word “piccola, which implies that it is feminine. I’m confused! Can you help clear this up for me please

  8. There are a number of Italian words that are exceptions to the masculine/feminine rule regarding the vowel at the end of the word. There are various reasons for this, such as a word that came from a foreign language, an abbreviation, etc. In the case of “auto”, the word is an abbreviation for “automobile”, which is feminine. When you abbreviate in Italian, the word keeps its gender, so “auto” is feminine. Based on this, the indefinite article is “una”. The problem is that “una auto” is too hard to say, so the “a” in “una” gets elided (dropped), and it becomes “un’auto” (a contraction).  

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